Kenneth D. Boivin

Ken Boivin joined GZA in 2000 and is an Associate Principal and Vice President.  Ken serves as GZA’s Institutional Client Sector lead, as well as practice group leader and senior practitioner in GZA’s Northern New England Environmental Practice.  He has more than 23 years of experience in industrial and institutional environmental compliance, air pollution control, air quality dispersion modeling, environmental management, site investigations, hazardous building materials and site redevelopment.    Ken has extensive experience assisting education, medical, and charitable non-profit clients

Policy Paper No. 4 of 5 - "Social Impacts of Industrial Sand (Frac Sand) Mining - Land Use and Value"

Author: 
Mark Krumenacher and Isaac Orr
Date: 
Tue, 02/02/2016 - 12:00am

As many as 9,000 non-metallic mines operate in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, approximately one mine per 3,000 residents.  They include limestone and granite quarries in addition to sand and gravel mines, providing aggregate for construction, stones for monuments, and sand for glassmaking, foundries, livestock bedding, and oil and natural gas development. These mines represent an enormous amount of economic activity operating without widespread regional impacts on human health or the environment.

Contact: 
For more information:
Contact: 
Mark Krumenacher
Phone: 
262.754.2565

Policy Paper No. 3 of 5 - "Roadway Impacts of Industrial Sand (Frac Sand) Mining"

Author: 
Mark Krumenacher and Isaac Orr
Date: 
Wed, 09/02/2015 - 12:00am

Industrial silica sand has been mined in the upper Midwest for more than one hundred years. In Wisconsin, an estimated 2,500 non-metallic mines, including limestone and granite quarries in addition to sand and gravel mines, provide aggregate for construction, stones for monuments, and sand for glassmaking, foundries, livestock bedding, and oil and natural gas development.

Contact: 
For more information:
Contact: 
Mark Krumenacher
Phone: 
262.754.2565

Policy Paper No. 2 of 5 - "Economic Impacts of Industrial Silica Sand (Frac Sand) Mining"

Author: 
Mark Krumenacher and Isaac Orr
Date: 
Tue, 06/02/2015 - 12:00am

Industrial silica sand has been mined across the United States for more than a century. Until recently, this sand was used primarily for glassmaking, cores for molding metal castings at foundries, metal production, feedstock for household and industrial cleaners, and construction supplies such as concrete. A small share of the sand was used for hydraulic fracturing, a technique used in oil and natural gas production.

Contact: 
For more information:
Contact: 
Mark Krumenacher
Phone: 
262.754.2565

Policy Paper No. 1 of 5 - "Environmental Impacts of Industrial Silica Sand (Frac Sand) Mining"

Author: 
Mark Krumenacher and Isaac Orr
Date: 
Sat, 05/02/2015 - 12:00am

Sand has been mined for industrial processes across the United States for more than a century.  Referred to as silica sand or industrial sand, it is used for a variety of essential industrial purposes, including as feedstock for glassmaking, cores for molding metal castings at foundries, metal production, and household and industrial cleaners; construction supplies such as concrete; bedding for livestock; an abrasive in toothpaste; filtering drinking water; and hydraulic fracturing, a technique used in oil and natural gas production.

Contact: 
For more information:
Contact: 
Mark Krumenacher
Phone: 
262.754.2565

Policy Paper No. 5 of 5 - "Comprehensive Regulatory Control and Oversight of Industrial Sand (Frac Sand) Mining"

Author: 
Mark Krumenacher and Isaac Orr
Date: 
Fri, 12/02/2016 - 12:00am

Every aspect of industrial sand mining is regulated by more than 20,000 pages of federal, state, or local government laws and ordinances that combine to form a comprehensive regulatory framework established to protect human and environmental health from the potential impacts of all industrial activities, including industrial sand mining.  This comprehensive regulatory structure is designed to protect the health and welfare of the environment, the general public, and people working at industrial sand operations.  Critics of industrial sand mining claim it is an unregulated industry allowed t

Contact: 
For more information:
Contact: 
Mark Krumenacher
Phone: 
262.754.2565

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